The BEST Places to Camp Near Bryce Canyon National Park

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Dazzling rock spires, colorful landscapes, and spectacular stargazing are just a few of the many reasons nearly 2 million visitors are drawn to Bryce Canyon National Park each year. Regardless of how you choose to experience this magical destination, spending a few nights under Bryce’s famously dark skies should definitely be part of your itinerary. Camping is a great way to immerse yourself in all that the area has to offer, and there are options in and around Bryce Canyon to suit every type of camper.

From developed campgrounds inside the national park to free dispersed camping nearby, we’ve laid out all of the best places to camp near Bryce Canyon National Park. Read on for all you need to know before heading out and to find your perfect Bryce Canyon campsite.

In this post…

The Basics

The following sections contain all the essential information you need to plan your Bryce Canyon National Park camping trip. We’ll cover everything from when to go, what to bring, and important rules and regulations to keep in mind.

When to Camp Near Bryce Canyon National Park

Bryce Canyon is set in a high elevation climate, meaning that the weather can be quite variable, especially in the shoulder seasons. Temperatures fall below freezing nearly every night from October through May, making summer (June-September) the most pleasant time to camp in or near Bryce Canyon National Park. Hardy campers can certainly enjoy the beauty and solitude of the winter months, but should be ready for heavy snowfall that can occur anytime from October through April. Summer campers should be prepared for frequent afternoon thunderstorms in July and August and have a safe place to shelter, if necessary.

Reservations and Permits

Reservation and permit requirements vary based on where you choose to camp. Below is a summary of the major camping areas covered in this guide. See specific campground descriptions for details.

Bryce Canyon National Park Campsites: Reservations are required for the North Campground (summer season), Sunset Campground group sites, and ADA sites. The standard sites at the Sunset Campground are first-come, first-served. All visitors to the national park must purchase a pass to enter. Permits are required for backcountry camping.

Dixie National Forest: With the exception of group sites, all sites in the King Creek and Red Canyon Campgrounds are first-come, first-served. No permits are required for dispersed camping. Dispersed campers may stay in one spot for up to 16 consecutive nights and then must move at least ten miles away before camping in another dispersed area. Permits are required if you want to bring in firewood from outside of the area.

Kodachrome Basin State Park: Reservations are strongly recommended for campsites in the Basin, Arch, and Bryce View Campgrounds. Camping reservations can be made online. Permits are not required for camping.

Bureau of Land Management: Those wanting seeking dispersed camping on BLM land should carefully check the maps and reference the BLM website for details. Generally speaking, permits are not required.

Privately-Operated Campgrounds: It’s a good idea to make advance reservations during the peak summer season for the developed campgrounds and RV parks near Bryce Canyon.

Camping Near Bryce Canyon National Park Map
This NPS Map highlights some of the most popular camping areas near Bryce Canyon (click to enlarge).

What to Bring

The wilderness surrounding Bryce Canyon is quite rugged and the weather can change quickly in the high plateau environment. While your packing list will vary based on the type of camping you plan to do, everyone should be prepared with some key pieces of gear.

We’re sure you already have the essentials like a great tentsleeping bags, and camp chairs, but below are some of our favorite items specifically for camping near Bryce Canyon:

  • Map: A good map, like the National Geographic one linked here, is essential to making sure you are on public land, exploring the area, and learning more about your surroundings. This Lonely Planet Planning Map is also great for those wanting to check out the other great parks in the area.
  • Coleman Camping Stove – This classic piece of gear is perfect for cooking up deluxe campsite dinners.
  • Portable water container – Water is scarce in the Bryce Canyon area and none of the dispersed campsites in this guide have reliable access. As such, a portable water container is essential.
  • Cooler – Keeping food and drinks cool is critical when camping. We can’t recommend Yeti enough!
  • Portable toilet – Many of the dispersed camping areas around Bryce Canyon are located in sensitive desert environments. Bringing a portable toilet ensures you don’t pollute or damage this beautiful place.

Other Considerations

  • Regardless of where you choose to camp, be sure to abide by Leave No Trace principles.
  • The peak summer season can get quite busy in Bryce Canyon National Park. It’s a good idea to make reservations well in advance or prepare to search a bit further afield to find a campsite.
  • Wildfires are common in this dry region. It is critical that campers follow fire safety guidelines and check for fire restrictions before heading out.
Hoodoos at Bryce Canyon National Park
Bryce Canyon National Park is known for its dramatic hoodoos, or rock spires.

Developed Campgrounds & RV Parks Near Bryce Canyon National Park

Those seeking the creature comforts and convenience of developed campgrounds will have a wide range of options in and around Bryce Canyon National Park. Read on for the top picks in the national park, the national forest, state parks, and privately-operated campgrounds.

Bryce Canyon National Park Campgrounds

North Campground

Number of sites: 100
Fee: $20/night (tent) or $30/night (RV) + park entrance fee
Capacity: 10 people
Type: 50 RV-only sites, 46 tent-only sites, 4 group sites
Reservations: Available online for May 27-October 1. First-come, first served in the winter months.
Pets: Allowed
Season: Open all year
More Information

This is an excellent option if you’re able to snag a site at this popular campground. Located close to the visitor’s center, general store, park shuttle, and Fairyland Loop Trail, the North Campground makes a perfect basecamp for exploring everything that Bryce Canyon National Park has to offer.

The North Campground has flush toilets, drinking water, picnic tables, and fire rings/grills. There are no RV hookups, but there is a dump station nearby.

Sunset Campground

Number of sites: 100
Fee: $20/night (tent) or $30/night (RV) + park entrance fee
Capacity: 10 people
Type: 50 RV-only sites, 50 tent-only sites
Reservations: First-come, first served. Reservations for group sites can be made online.
Pets: Allowed
Season: April-October
More Information

The Sunset Campground is the more primitive option of the two developed campgrounds in Bryce Canyon National Park. The campground is arranged into three loops, two for tents and more geared more towards RVs. Although there are no hookups, the sites can accommodate rigs up to 25 feet long. The campground is located about 1.5 miles south of the visitor center and general store, but a free shuttle is available for easy travel throughout the park.

The Sunset Campground has toilets, potable water (not available at individual sites), picnic tables, and fire rings/grills. RV campers can use the dump station near the North Campground.

A tent and an RV at the North Campground Bryce Canyon National Park
The North Campground. Photo courtesy of NPS.

Dixie National Forest Campgrounds

Utah’s largest national forest, Dixie National Forest covers nearly 200 million acres of land near Bryce Canyon and Zion National Parks, as well as Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument. Camping and recreation opportunities abound in this beautiful slice of wilderness. This section outlines the best developed campgrounds near Bryce Canyon. See the following section to learn about dispersed camping in Dixie National Forest.

King Creek Campground

Number of sites: 37 standard, 2 group
Fee: $19/night + $9 for an extra vehicle
Capacity: 8 people
Type: Tent or RVs (max 45 feet, no hookups)
Reservations: First-come, first served. Reservations for group sites can be made online.
Pets: Allowed
Season: May 28-September 19
More Information

Situated along the Tropic Reservoir and just 9 miles from Bryce Canyon National Park, the King Creek Campground provides virtually endless opportunities for all types of recreation. The campground is quite popular with ATV enthusiasts, mountain bikers, and hikers, as it is adjacent to a number of trails for each activity. Boaters will appreciate the easy proximity to launch onto Tropic Reservoir. Finally, the quick access to Bryce Canyon makes this a favorite for those wanting to explore the national park.

Amenities at the King Creek Campground include flush toilets, drinking water, fire pits, and picnic tables.

Red Canyon Campground

Number of sites: 37
Fee: $21/night + $9 for an extra vehicle
Capacity: 8 people
Type: Tent or RVs (max 45 feet, no hookups)
Reservations: First-come, first served.
Pets: Allowed
Season: April 30-October 11
More Information

The Red Canyon Campground is just a twenty-minute drive away from the Bryce Canyon NP Visitor Center, making it a convenient option for exploring the park as well as the surrounding area. Several excellent hiking and biking trails can be accessed close by, including the Buckhorn trail which runs right through the campground.

The Red Canyon Campground has flush toilets, potable water, showers, and garbage facilities. Each site has a picnic table and fire ring. There is also a dump station on site.

Sign for Dixie National Forest with red rocks in the background.
Dixie National Forest offers endless camping and recreation opportunities.

Kodachrome Basin State Park

Kodachrome Basin State Park is located a little over a dozen miles southeast of Bryce Canyon National Park. Known for its colorful rock spires and dramatic landscapes, it is a worthy destination in its own right. It can also make a great basecamp for exploring Bryce Canyon, Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument, and the area’s other great outdoor attractions. Kodachrome’s three developed campgrounds are described below.

Bryce View Campground

Number of sites: 11
Fee: $25/night
Capacity: 4 people, 1 vehicle
Type: Tent or RVs (max 20 feet, no hookups)
Reservations: Recommended. Can be made online.
Pets: Allowed
Season: Open all year
More Information

This small campground is a great option for those seeking a bit of peace and quiet. Plus, the scenery is similar to and nearly as beautiful as Bryce Canyon National Park itself. The Bryce View Campground is set in more of a desert environment than the neighboring options, but the great views and starry nights make up for the lack of shade. The bathrooms and sites tend to be very clean and well kept.

Amenities at the Bryce View Campground include vault toilets, potable water, picnic tables, and fire rings. Campers can go to the nearby Oasis Group Site or Basin Campground to use the showers.

Basin Campground

Number of sites: 36
Fee: $25/night (standard site), $35/night (full hookups)
Capacity: 8 people, 1 vehicle
Type: Tent or RVs (max 50 feet)
Reservations: Recommended. Can be made online.
Pets: Allowed
Season: March 2-November 30
More Information

With its excellent amenities, beautiful views, and spacious sites, the Basin Campground delivers a luxuriously comfortable camping experience in Kodachrome Basin State Park. It is just steps away from several great hiking trails, and the paved roads provide easy access for all vehicles. Reservations are recommended at this popular campground, although two standard and two full-hookup sites are maintained as first-come, first-served sites for those who want to try their luck.

The Basin Campground has flush toilets, potable water, showers, picnic tables, and fire rings.

Arch Campground

Number of sites: 13
Fee: $35/night
Capacity: 8 people, 1 vehicle
Type: Tent or RVs (max 35 feet, water & electric hookups)
Reservations: Recommended. Can be made online.
Pets: Allowed
Season: Open all year
More Information

The newest of Kodachrome Basin State Park’s three campgrounds, the Arch Campground is great for smaller RVs and tent campers. The water and electric hookups make this a great option for cooler-weather camping, and the proximity to the park visitor center is very convenient.

Amenities at the Arch Campground include vault toilets, potable water, picnic tables, and fire rings. Campers can go to the nearby Oasis Group Site or Basin Campground to use the showers.

Starry night skies while camping at Kodachrome Basin State Park
Starry night skies while camping at Kodachrome Basin State Park.

Privately-Operated Campgrounds

Bryce Canyon Pines Campground

Number of sites: 15 tent sites, 30 RV sites
Fee: $30/night (tent), $50-60/night (RV)
Capacity: Varies
Type: Tent or RVs (max 40 feet, full hookups)
Reservations: Recommended. Can be made online.
Pets: Not allowed
Season: April-November
More Information

Tucked among Ponderosa Pines, this campground has a peaceful woodsy feel to it, despite its larger size. It is located just ten minutes from Bryce Canyon National Park, allowing visitors to minimize time in the car and maximize their time exploring the park. The campground is also located near a great bike trail and a gas station/convenience store, although you can also expect a bit of highway noise.

The Bryce Canyon Pines Campground has bathrooms, showers, laundry, picnic tables and fire rings. Be advised that the bathrooms close for cleaning from 7-8am each morning.

Cannonville/Bryce Valley KOA

Number of sites: Plenty!
Fee: $33-85/night, depending on site type
Capacity: 5 people
Type: Tent or RVs (max 65 feet)
Reservations: Recommended. Can be made online.
Pets: Allowed
Season: Open all year
More Information

This great campground has all of the amenities that you can expect from a KOA, including a swimming pool, camp store, and kitchen. It is conveniently located less than half an hour from the Bryce Canyon National Park Visitor Center, as well as down the road from shops and restaurants in the town of Tropic. With a variety of sites to choose from, including full hookup, partial hookup, big rig friendly, and tent-only sites, the KOA can accommodate all types of campers.

Amenities include bathrooms, showers, laundry, pool, store, and wifi.

Ruby’s Inn RV Park and Campground

Number of sites: Plenty!
Fee: $31-60/night, depending on site type
Capacity: Varies
Type: Tent or RVs (max 50 feet)
Reservations: Recommended. Can be made online.
Pets: Allowed
Season: Open all year
More Information

Ruby’s is a camper favorite, and deservedly so. This well-appointed RV Park and campground has tons of great amenities, and it is just a mile from the entrance of Bryce Canyon National Park. The free shuttle makes it easy to get into the park and around town. There are several sites that can accommodate large rigs and the staff are friendly and helpful.

Amenities at Ruby’s Inn RV Park and Campground include a pool and hot tub, showers, wifi, well-stocked general store, and laundry facilities.

Bryce Point at sunrise, Bryce Canyon National Park Camping
Bryce Point at sunrise. Photo courtesy of NPS/Brian B. Roanhorse.

Dispersed Camping Near Bryce Canyon National Park

Dispersed camping near Bryce Canyon National Park allows you to get back to the basic and enjoy the beauty of nature…not to mention it’s completely free! Most of the best dispersed camping areas near Bryce Canyon NP are located within Dixie National Forest, although the are some BLM options as well.

Dixie National Forest Dispersed Camping

Dave’s Hollow

Restrooms: No
Water: 
No
Crowds:
 Heavy/Moderate
Map

With many sites just 15-20 minutes from Bryce Canyon National Park, this is a convenient dispersed camping area in Dixie National Forest. This area includes Forest Roads 1164 and 2367 as well as parts of FR103 and FR88. Sites are relatively level and the surrounding pine trees offer quite a bit of privacy. Forest Road 1164 is only recommended for high-clearance vehicles, but the others should be accessible for most vehicles.

There are no potable water sources or toilets in this area. Come prepared and remember to Leave No Trace. Pay close attention to the camping restrictions, as parts of Dave’s Hollow have been closed for restoration. It’s a good idea to check with the Forest Service Office for up-to-date information before heading out.

Tom’s Best Spring Road (FR 117)

Restrooms: No
Water: 
No
Crowds:
 Heavy/Moderate
Map

This is another great dispersed camping area just 15 minutes from Bryce Canyon National Park. There are tons of great campsites that are suitable for all types of campers. The area is actually comprised of multiple loop roads that stem from both sides of Tom’s Best Spring Road. The FR 3626 and FR 3627 loops are the most suitable for RVs, while the FR 646/FR3625 loop is pretty rugged but has the best views. Campers are required to use existing sites (marked with fire rings) to minimize environmental impacts.

There are vault toilets located at the intersection of Tom’s Best Spring Road and Scenic Byway 12, but you’ll need to pack in all of your own water.

Corral Hollow/Cabin Hollow (FR 121)

Restrooms: No
Water: 
No
Crowds:
 Moderate
Map

This is a beautiful and quiet dispersed camping area that is close to both Red Canyon and Bryce Canyon National Park. From Scenic Byway 12, take FR 121 (Corral Hollow Rd) about half a mile until you begin to see campsites on either side of the road. Camping is permitted within 150 feet of either side of the road for the next few miles. The road is rough but generally accessible for 2WD vehicles in the first couple of miles, but becomes significantly more rugged after that.

Restrooms and water are available at the Red Canyon Visitor Center just five minutes down the road.

East Fork Road (No. 87)

Restrooms: No
Water: 
No
Crowds:
 Busy/Moderate
Map

There are ten designated primitive campsites along the East Fork of the Sevier River, south of the Tropic Reservoir. These lovely sites are about half an hour’s drive from the Bryce Canyon NP Visitor Center and the road, while rough, is accessible for all vehicles. Those seeking more privacy should aim to camp at sites 1, 7,8,9, or 10, as these are single-unit sites. The remaining sites are multi-unit sites, meaning they are shared between campers. It is required that you camp only in the designated sites, as no other dispersed camping is permitted in the area. This map provides clear guidelines about camping restrictions.

There are no potable water sources or toilets in this area. Come prepared and remember to Leave No Trace. Water can be obtained from Tropic Spring, located on the east side of the reservoir.

FR 88

Restrooms: No
Water: 
No
Crowds:
 Moderate
Map

If you’re hoping to spend some time on the water in addition to visiting Bryce Canyon National Park, this dispersed camping area is an excellent option. Not only is it just a few miles from Tropic Reservoir, it is also only fifteen minutes from the Bryce Canyon Visitor Center. In addition to its convenient location, the Forest Road 88 camping area has spacious, peaceful sites and is typically uncrowded. Be advised that the road is quite rugged and may not be suitable for all vehicles.

There are no potable water sources or toilets in this area. Come prepared and remember to Leave No Trace.

John’s Valley Road (Hwy 22)

Restrooms: No
Water: 
No
Crowds:
 Moderate
Map

This little gem of a dispersed camping area is just fifteen minutes from Bryce Canyon National Park, and offers a handful of large, flat sites less than half a mile off the main road. It’s right on the border of public trust land and Dixie National Forest, so if you explore beyond the coordinates provided be advised that camping regulations could be different than those described here. The road is a bit rough in spots, but should be accessible for most vehicles and RVs. You may hear some road noise and see some cow pies, but these are very slight annoyances rather than major issues.

There are no potable water sources or toilets in this area. Come prepared and remember to Leave No Trace.

Tent in the sunrise near Bryce Canyon National Park
Dispersed camping provides more peace and solitude than you’ll find in most campgrounds.

BLM Dispersed Camping

Losee Canyon/Castro Canyon Road

Restrooms: Yes
Water: 
No
Crowds:
 Light/Moderate
Map

This scenic dispersed camping option provides excellent access to some of the area’s best trails from the Losee and Castro Canyon Trailheads. Sites are quite level, and the well-maintained road is manageable for most vehicles. The area straddles the border between BLM land and Dixie National Forest; those seeking greater solitude can venture down one of the adjacent rugged BLM loop roads to find additional sites. Bryce Canyon National Park is approximately half an hour away.

Vault toilets are available at both the Losee and Castro Canyon trailheads. Potable water and a dump station are available at the nearby Red Canyon Campground.

Trail with hoodoos and dark clouds in the background, Bryce Canyon National Park

Have a great trip!

We hope this guide helps you find your perfect campsite near Bryce Canyon National Park. Leave us a comment to ask a question or tell us about your trip. Happy camping and don’t forget to Leave No Trace!

Searching for more great camping in Utah? Check out some of our other guides below:

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