Category: Everglades National Park

The Complete Guide to Camping in Everglades National Park

Everglades National Park is one of America’s largest and most unique national parks. Covering an area of over 1.5 million acres, the Everglades preserves a truly unique ecosystem. Located in…

Everglades National Park is one of America’s largest and most unique national parks. Covering an area of over 1.5 million acres, the Everglades preserves a truly unique ecosystem. Located in southern Florida, the park protects incredibly biodiverse landscapes including freshwater sloughs, mangrove forests, pine forests, marine and tidal estuaries, and more. We think the best way to experience this one of a kind environment is to spend a few nights under the stars camping in Everglades National Park. 

The Everglades have some truly unique options for your next camping trip. There are two developed campgrounds located in the national park, beach campsites, backcountry ‘chickee’ campsites and nearby RV sites. Needless to say, whichever type of camping trip in Everglades National Park you’re planning they’ll be a great option for you.

Keeping reading to get all the details to plan your perfect camping trip in Everglades National Park.

Tent in the Flamingo Campground in Everglades National Park

Flamingo Campground, Everglades National Park. Photo Credit NPS/Rodney Cammauf

 

In this Post

 

Everglades National Park Campgrounds

There are two developed campgrounds located within Everglades National Park. Both campgrounds are located along State Highway 9336, the main road through the national park, and are easily accessed from the Miami area. To reach either campground you’ll pass through the Homestead Entrance and have the option to visit the Ernest F. Coe Visitor Center.

The map below gives you a general sense of where each of these campgrounds are located in Everglades National Park as well as their relation to the surrounding area. 

Map of campgrounds in Everglades National Park.

Campgrounds in Everglades National Park. Map courtesy of NPS. (Click to enlarge)

 

The Flamingo Campground in Everglades National Park is open year round, although you’ll find it is much less crowded during the summer off-season. This is for good reason and camping in the summer in the Everglades can be unbearable!

The Lone Pine Key Campground is only open during the peak season, generally from November through the first part  of May.

Peak season for camping in the Everglades is from December – April, during South Florida’s dry season. During this time you’ll have the best chance for sun, milder temperatures, and avoid the mosquito swarms that are typical during the summer months.

Keep reading to learn more about reserving your campground in Everglades National Park.

Reservations & Permits

Reservations for the campgrounds in Everglades National Park are recommend, but depend on which campground you are considering:

  • Lone Pine Key Campground only accepts reservations for the campsites that allow RVs and does not accept reservations for any of the tent sites, which are made available on a first-come, first-served basis.
  • Flamingo Campground accepts reservations for RV campsites and drive-in tent campsites, but does not accept reservations for the 38 walk-in tent sites.

While neither of the two campgrounds in Everglades National Park require advance reservations, we highly recommend making one for any time during the peak season, generally December – April. The last thing you want is to pack up all of your camping gear only to arrive at a full campground!

Unlike many of the national parks, reservations for the Lone Pine Campground and Flamingo Campground are not managed through Recreation.gov. Instead, Flamingo Adventures, a private ‘concessioner’ of the National Park Service, operates both of these campgrounds. To make a reservation at either campground, visit their website below:

Reservations for Everglades National Park Campgrounds can be made here via Flamingo Adventures

RVs in the Lone Pine Key Campground, Everglades National Park.

Expect both campgrounds in Everglades National Park to be full during peak season. Photo credit NPS.

 

For those interested in exploring the vast wilderness on offer in the Everglades, a wilderness permit is required. Permits can be obtained from either the Flamingo Visitor Center, located in the far south area of the park, or the Gulf Coast Visitor Center, located at the northwest entrance to the park.

Wilderness permits can only be obtained the day before or the day of your planned departure. This makes it very important to have flexible plans for your backcountry trip in the Everglades, as there is no way to ensure your preferred campground will be available.

Our best advice? Get there early and have a few options in mind! The rangers at the permit desks are also very knowledgeable and can often suggest excellent alternative itineraries.

Permits cost $15 + $2/person per day.

Learn more about wilderness camping in Everglades National Park in this section.

 

Frontcountry & Car camping sites

There are two ‘frontcountry’ campgrounds located in Everglades National Park: Flamingo Campground and Lone Pine Key Campground. Both are located along State Highway 9336 and provide camping options for tents and RVs. Full details for both of these excellent campgrounds are below.

Lone Pine Key Campground

Number of Sites: 108 individual (up to 6 people) and 1 group site (up to 15 people)
Fee: $25/night for individual sites, $35/night for the group site
RVs: Yes. No electric or water hookups available, but a dump station is available.
Reservations: Recommended for RV sites. Tent sites are first-come, first-served.
More Information
Click Here to Reserve

Entrance to the Lone Pine Key Campground

Lone Pine Key Campground. Photo credit NPS.

 

The Lone Pine Key Campground is the smaller and more basic of the two campgrounds located in Everglades National Park. It is also the first campground you’ll reach when entering the national park from the Homestead Entrance. Lone Pine Key is open seasonally from November – early-May. The campground is located adjacent to the Long Pine Key trail, so is a great place to spend the night prior to exploring the trail.

Lone Pine Key features 108 individual campsites that can accommodate up to 6 people each as well as one group site for up to 15 people. Reservations can be made for the RV sites at the campground, but all of the tent-sites are first-come, first-served. The RV campsites do not have any water or electric hookups, but there is a dump station at the campground.

The campground features cold water showers and each campsites comes with a picnic table, fire pit, and grill stand. There is also a small lake adjacent to the campground where fishing is permitted, but do not swim as alligators are known to frequent the area.

Pine trees behind water on the Long Pine Key Trail in Everglades National Park

The Long Pine Key Trail starts at the Lone Pine Key campground. Photo credit NPS/Denise Diaz.

 

Flamingo Campground

Number of Sites: 157 sites
Fee: $25 – $45/night depending on hookups
RVs: Yes.
Reservations: Recommended for RV/drive in tent sites. Walk-in tent sites are first-come, first-served.
More Information
Click Here to Reserve

Tents set up at the Flamingo Campground in the Everglades

Flamingo Campground, Everglades National Park. Photo credit NPS/Rodney Cammauf.

The Flamingo Campground is the largest and most popular in the Everglades. The campground is located at the far southern tip of the national park and features drive-in RV and tent sites as well as walk-in tent sites on the Florida Bay. In addition, the campground also features ‘eco-tents’ which are small “safari style” canvas tents that include electricity, fans, and a small deck to sit on. Eco-tents can be reserved with or without a bed.

View a map of the Flamingo Campground here. 

Eco-tents at the Flamingo campground

Eco-tents at the Flamingo Campground. Photo credit NPS/Dylann Turffs.

 

We highly recommend reserving your RV site well in advance for the peak season as the Flamingo Campground is known to fill up. RV sites are available with or without electricity and there is potable water and a dump station available at the campground. Drive in tent sites are available in addition to the walk-in sites that are along the Florida Bay. For the walk-in campsite you’ll have to park your car and then walk your camping setup out to your site. Well worth it for a campsite on the Bay!

All campsites feature a picnic table, fire ring, and grill stand or fire grate.

The campground is near the Christian Point Trail and the Coastal Prairie Trail making it a great place to spend the night before exploring the area.

RVs parked at the Flamingo Campground in Everglades National Park

Photo credit NPS/Rodney Cammauf.

 

Looking for more campgrounds near the Everglades? Check out this section!

 

Backcountry & Wilderness campsites in the Everglades

Exploring the backcountry wilderness of Everglades National Park is an experience like no other. Rather than setting out on a hiking trail, most visitors to the Everglades wilderness rely on canoes, kayaks, or other small boats to access the backcountry. This will reward backcountry campers with solitude, quiet, and an opportunity to immerse themselves in this spectacular ecosystem.

Wilderness camping in the Everglades is best done during the winter (December – March) as temperatures are much more moderate and you’re likely to encounter clearer weather. Only a hardy few will brave the backcountry during the summer, as the heat, humidity, and mosquitos can be unbearable. Plan ahead accordingly!

Backcountry campers should plan to bring all of the potable water they need with them on their trip. Drinking water can be scarce to non-existent in the backcountry so plan to bring at least 1 gallon per person per day. The National Park Service recommends sturdy containers to prevent wildlife from getting your water. This means no plastic gallon containers!

With the right plan in place you’re sure to have a great trip in the backcountry of Everglades National Park. Learn everything you need to know to place your trip below.

Kayak on the beach in Everglades National Park

Exploring the backcountry in Everglades National Park. Photo credit NPS.

 

Everglades Wilderness Campsites

Backcountry campers are required to stay at one of the 45 designated wilderness campsites located throughout the park. The campsites consist of beach sites along the Gulf of Mexico, ground sites situated on islands or other land areas, and “Chickees”, platform campsites that sit above the water.

All of the campsites within the national park have specific limits for the number of people, number of groups, and number of tents that are permitted at a specific campsite. Beach sites tend to have the largest capacity, up to 60 people in some cases, while single Chickee sites can often only accommodate up to 6 people.

The National Park Service has an excellent table listing all of the wilderness campsites in the Everglades and their capacity here. You can view a map of all of wilderness campgrounds in the Everglades below:

Map of wilderness campsites in Everglades National Park

Map of wilderness campsites in Everglades National Park. Map courtesy of NPS. (Click to enlarge)

 

More details on each type of campsite in Everglades National Park are below:

Everglades Beach Campsites

Beach campsites in Everglades National Park are primarily located along the Gulf Coast. Beach campsites can accommodate up to 60 people (!), although there are smaller, more secluded sites available. These campsites do not have potable water sources or bathrooms, so be prepared to bring all of the water you’ll need and properly dispose of human waste. Campfires are generally allowed at beach campsites as long as they are located below the high-tide line.

Tent and Kayak on the beach in Everglades National Park

Beach campsite in Everglades National Park. Photo credit NPS.

 

Everglades Ground campsites

Ground campsites are exactly what they sound like: wilderness campsites located on solid ground within the park. These campsites are located on small islands, inland areas, and other places where the ground is stable enough to support a campsite. Campfires are not allowed at ground campsites in the Everglades.

Pinelands in Everglades National Park

Ground campsite are mostly located in the interior of the Everglades. Photo credit NPS/Caitlin Rivas.

 

Everglades Chickees

Chickees are the most unique campsite option in the Everglades. These campsites are located over water and consist of a 10′ x 12′ wooden platform with an attached porta-pottie. Many of the chickee sites contain two platforms connected by a walkway to the bathroom. You’ll need to be sure to bring a free standing tent, as there is no way to stake a tent on a chickee. Campfires are not allowed at chickee campsites and visitors will also want to be sure to bring a rope to secure their water craft while camping.

Chickee campsite in Everglades National Park.

A chickee campsite in the Everglades. Photo credit NPS.

 

Everglades Wilderness Camping Permits & Regulations

All backcountry campers in Everglades National Park are required to obtain a wilderness permit prior to starting their trip. During the peak season (November – April) permits can be obtained in person at the Gulf Coast Visitor Center or Flamingo Visitor Center. During the off season (May – October) permits can be obtained via self-registering at either of the visitor centers above. When obtaining a permit for a wilderness trip in the Everglades there are a few important things to keep in mind:

  • Permits cost $15 +$2/person per night in the peak season. Permits are free in the off season.
  • Permits can only be obtained up to 24 hours prior to your trip.
    • This means you may not be able to reserve your preferred campsite. Always have a backup plan!
  • Campsites have varying capacity for the number of groups, tents, and people. Be sure your planned campsite can accommodate your group.
  • Plan to arrive as early as possible to secure permits during peak season. You’ll have a better chance of getting your preferred campsite.
Mangrove in Everglades National Park.

Wilderness permits are required for backcountry camping in the Everglades. Photo credit NPS/Brian Call.

 

Wilderness Camping trips in Everglades National Park

As you’re planning your wilderness camping trip in Everglades National Park you’ll want to spend some time thinking about your planned route. While there are countless options, the  most popular trip is described below:

Everglades Wilderness Waterway

The Everglades Wilderness Waterway is a 99-mile route that traverses the national park via canoe, kayak, or small boat. The route connects Flamingo, FL with Everglades City, FL and is the most famous backcountry adventure in the Everglades. Expect the trip to take anywhere from between 10 – 14 days if traveling by kayak or canoe.

This is a serious undertaking so be sure you are up to the challenge and check out these helpful resources below:

Canoe on the Everglades Wilderness Waterway.

Exploring the Everglades wilderness. Photo credit NPS.

 

For those who are in search of a more mellow outing, don’t be dissuaded. There are plenty of easier overnight trips into the Everglades wilderness that don’t require two weeks of paddling! Your best bet is consult the Wilderness Trip Planner and to talk to one of the rangers at the Everglades National Park Visitor Centers to learn what might be a good option for you.

 

Everglades National Park Camping Must Know

The following sections contain all the basic information you need to ensure you have a great time camping in Everglades National Park. First a few basics:

  • Be sure you know the maximum group size allowed at your planned campsite. 
  • Practice Leave No Trace principles at all of the campsites within the Everglades.
  • You are not permitted to camp in Everglades National Park for more than 30 days/year. During peak season from November 1st – April 1st you are not allowed to camp in the Everglades for more than 14 consecutive days.

Fires

Campfires are permitted at both of the developed campgrounds (Flamingo and Lone Pine Key) in Everglades National Park. Your fire must be contained in the provided fire pit and should not be left unattended at any time. Always be sure your campfire is completely put out before going to bed or leaving your campsite.

In the backcountry, campfires are only permitted on the beach campsites. Here, fires must be located below the high-tide line. You are permitted to use wood that is already down or dead, but do not cut live wood in the national park for your fire.

Campfire in Everglades National Park.

 

Wildlife

Everglades National Park is renowned for its incredible wildlife that inhabits the park. This unique ecosystem hosts an incredible diversity of fauna, and as such it is important to minimize your impact on this ecosystem. For campers, there are a few specific species that you’ll want to be aware of, outlined below:

  • Raccoons: While raccoons are certainly not the first animal that comes to mind when thinking about the Everglades, they are one of the most pesky for wilderness campers. Raccoons are known to steal water and food of wilderness campers so be sure you’ve properly stored both while camping.
  • Vultures: Vultures are native to the Everglades, but are known to cause problems for visitors and campers alike. They are attracted to rubber parts and pieces on automobiles, tents, and campers, and have been known to cause quite a bit of damage. The park service will provide visitors with a free tarp and bungee cords to protect your vehicle or camper. Learn more here.
  • Alligators & Crocodiles: The quintessential wildlife of the Everglades, alligators and crocodiles are found throughout the park. These creatures will generally leave campers and visitors alone, but it always pays off to be vigilant. More important, please be respectful of their habitat as they are a keystone species in the Everglades.

Alligator swimming in Everglades National Park

 

Pets

Pets are only allowed in specific areas of Everglades National Park. They are allowed at both of the developed campgrounds in the national park, along park roads, in areas near park facilities, and on private boats.

Pets are not allowed in the wilderness or backcountry in Everglades National Park.

If you plan to bring your pet to the Everglades, please observe these regulations:

  • Pets must be kept of a leash at all times
  • Please pick up your pet waste.
  • Always practice Leave No Trace principles.

A full description of regulations surrounding pets in the Everglades can be found here.

Where to get supplies

Given the remote nature of Everglades National Park, it is important to stock up on camping supplies prior to your trip. The best place to stock up on camping supplies will depend on which section of the park you plan to camp in. We’ve broken down your best bets by entrance stations below:

  • Homestead Entrance (Lone Pine Key & Flamingo Campgrounds)
    • Homestead, FL: The Homestead Entrance is used by campers staying at the two developed campgrounds in the Everglades. A short, 20-minute drive from the entrance station is the town of Homestead, FL. Here you’ll find everything you need to prepare for a camping trip including grocery stores, gas stations, and a fishing shop.
  • Miami Entrance (wilderness camping)
    • Miami, FL: The Miami Entrance to Everglades National Park doesn’t see many campers, as there are few wilderness campgrounds in this area of the park. However, it is the closest to the major metropolis of Miami where you’ll find any and all services you may need for your camping trip.
  • Everglades City Entrance (wilderness camping) 
    • Everglades City, FL: The Everglades City Entrance is commonly used by wilderness campers and is the traditional starting point of the Everglades Wilderness Waterway. Here you’ll find gas stations, a grocery store, and a few fishing shops. For other needs you’ll have to head to Naples, an approximate 45 minute drive from the entrance station.

Camping near Everglades National Park

Given the popularity and scarcity of options, it is always possible that you won’t be able to find a campground within Everglades National Park. However, don’t give up as there are plentiful camping options just outside the National Park boundary!

Many of these nearby campgrounds can be found in Big Cypress National Preserve, located just north of Everglades National Park. Big Cypress covers an area of over 700,000 acres and features eight developed campgrounds to choose from.  Check out your options for camping in Big Cypress National Preserve below.

Big Cypress National Preserve Campgrounds

Big Cypress National Preserve is located just north of Everglades National Park and is managed by the National Park Service. The preserve protects thousands of acres of cypress swamps and is an important ecosystem that has a symbiotic relationship with the Everglades.

Sunset in Big Cypress National Preserve

Big Cypress National Preserve provides excellent camping options near the Everglades. Photo credit NPS.

 

Of the eight campgrounds in the preserve four of them are available on a first-come, first-served basis, while the others are reservable via Recreation.gov. The map below gives you a general sense of where each of these campgrounds are located in Big Cypress National Preserve as well as their relation to the Everglades. 

Map of campgrounds in Big Cypress National Preserve

Map of the campgrounds in Big Cypress National Preserve. Map courtesy of NPS. (Click to enlarge)

As you look at the map above, note that Everglades National Park is located to the south (towards the bottom of the map), so a few of the campgrounds are much closer to the Everglades. The most convenient for visiting the Everglades are: Burns Lake, Monument Lake, Midway, Pinecrest, and Mitchell Landing. Details for all the campgrounds in Big Cypress National Preserve are below:

Bear Island Campground

Number of Sites: 40 sites
Fee: $10/night
RVs: Yes, no hookups available
Reservations: All sites first-come, first-served.
More Information

Bear Island is a basic campground located in the northern section of Big Cypress National Preserve. Reservations are not available for Bear Island and all campsites are first-come, first-served. The campsites features pit toilets and does not have running water or hookups. 

View a map of the Bear Island Campground here. 

Burns Lake Campground

Number of Sites: 15 sites (5 tent sites + 10 RV sites)
Fee: $24/night
RVs: Yes, no hookups available.
Reservations: Recommended.
Click Here to Reserve
More Information

The Burns Lake Campground is centrally located along State Highway 41. It is the closest campground to the Everglades City entrance to the national park, making it a great option for those looking to explore Everglades National Park. The campground is basic and features 15 campsites, 10 of which can accommodate RVs. There is no water available at the campground, although there is an RV dump station.

Reservations can be made for the Burns Lake Campground via Recreation.gov here.

View a map of the Burns Lake Campground here. 

Gator Head Campground

Number of Sites: 9 sites (tents only)
Fee: $10/night
RVs: No.
Reservations: All sites first-come, first-served.
More Information

The Gator Head Campground is located in the northern section of Big Cypress and is not very convenient to the national park. At Gator Head you’ll find a basic campground with only 9 sites. The campground can only accommodate tents, so no RVs are permitted. There is no potable water and all sites are available on a first-come, first-served basis.

Midway Campground

Number of Sites: 36 sites (10 tent sites + 26 RV sites)
Fee: $24/night for tent sites, $30/night for RV sites
RVs: Yes, electric hookups available.
Reservations: Recommended.
Click Here to Reserve
More Information

The Midway Campground is one of the largest campgrounds in Big Cypress National Preserve and is well located for visiting the Everglades. The campground has 36 campsites, 26 of which can accommodate RVs and provide electrical hookups. The campground has drinking water, restrooms, and a RV dump station.

Reservations can be made for the Midway Campground via Recreation.gov here.

You can take a virtual tour of the Midway Campground via Google Maps here

Mitchell Landing Campground

Number of Sites: 11 sites
Fee: $24/night
RVs: Yes, no hookups available.
Reservations: All sites first-come, first-served.
More Information

The Mitchell Landing Campground is a basic campground located near the Shark Valley Visitor Center in the Everglades. The campground has 11 first-come, first-served campsites and provides vault toilets. There is no drinking water available at Mitchell Landing, so plan to bring all the water you’ll need for your stay.

Monument Lake Campground

Number of Sites: 36 sites (10 tent sites + 26 RV sites)
Fee: $24/night for tent sites, $28/night for RV sites
RVs: Yes, no hookups available.
Reservations: Recommended.
Click Here to Reserve
More Information

The Monument Lake Campground features 36 campsites, 26 of which are designated for RVs. However, there are no RV hookups available at the campground. Monument Lake does not have any potable water or a dump station, so it is important to plan accordingly. The campground is well located for visiting the Everglades, as it is just off State Highway 41.

Reservations can be made for the Monument Lake Campground via Recreation.gov here.

Pinecrest Campground (Group Campground)

Number of Sites: 4 group sites
Fee: $30/night
RVs: No.
Reservations: Required.
Click Here to Reserve
More Information

The Pinecrest Group Campground is well located for visiting the Everglades, but is reserved for groups up to 15 people. The campground only has four sites, and all require advance reservations. There is no drinking water available and there are also no restrooms at the campground.

Reservations can be made for the Pinecrest Group Campground via Recreation.gov here.

Pink Jeep Campground

Number of Sites: 9 sites
Fee: $10/night
RVs: No.
Reservations: All sites first-come, first-served.
More Information

Pink Jeep Campground is located in the northern section of Big Cypress National Preserve. This is a basic campground, and requires an off-road vehicle to reach. There is no potable water available at Pink Jeep, although there are vault toilets.  Reservations are not available for Pink Jeep and all campsites are first-come, first-served.

 

RV campgrounds near the Everglades

Those camping in an RV will have plenty of options just outside Everglades National Park. RV campgrounds are conveniently located near all of the entrances to the national park. We’ve outlined your best bets for RV camping near the Everglades below.

RVs camped near Everglades National Park

There are plenty of RV campgrounds near Everglades National Park. Photo credit NPS.

 

Florida City Campsite and RV Park

Number of sites: Plenty!
Fee: $35/night
Capacity: None Stated.
RVs: Yes.
Reservations: Recommended.
Pets: Allowed.
More Information

The Florida City Campsite and RV Park is located in the Florida City/Homestead Area. This small campground is well located for those entering the Everglades via the Homestead Entrance Station, which is only a 20 minute drive from the campground.

The campground provides free WiFi, access to laundry facilities, and tons of nearby amenities.

View the Florida City Campsite & RV Park in Google Maps here.

 

Miami Everglades RV Resort

Number of sites: 471
Fee: $45 – $80/night depending on hookups & RV size.
Capacity: None stated.
RVs: Yes.
Reservations: Recommended. Click here to reserve.
Pets: Allowed.
More Information

The Miami Everglades RV Resort is a huge campground located in southwest Miami. The campground is close to both the Homestead and Shark Valley entrances to the national park. Here you’ll find a plethora of amenities that are sure to please even the most picky campers! Amenities include a clubhouse, laundry facilities, swimming pool, mini golf, WiFi and much more.

The Miami Everglades RV Resort can accommodate tents up to large RVs, so nearly every camper should be just fine here.

View the Miami Everglades RV Resort in Google Maps here.

Trail Lakes Campground

Number of sites: Plenty!
Fee: $30 – $50 depending on site/hookups.
Capacity: 4 – 8 people depending on site.
RVs: Yes, water and electric hookups available.
Reservations: Recommended. Click here to reserve. 
Pets: Allowed.
More Information

The Trail Lakes Campground is located in Ochopee, FL and is only 15 minutes from the Gulf Coast Visitor Center. This is a well regarded campsite and can accommodate everything from tents to large RVs. Sites come with a variety of electric hookup options and vary in price from $30 – $50/night. This is a family-owned campground and gets great reviews for the friendly staff.

View the Trail Lakes Campground in Google Maps here.

Chokoloskee Island Park

Number of sites: Plenty!
Fee: $59 – $69/night depending on season.
Capacity: None stated.
RVs: Yes, up to 30′. Full hookups available.
Reservations: Recommended. Click here to reserve.
Pets: Allowed.
More Information

The Chokoloskee Island Park Campground is located on Chokoloskee Island, just a few minutes from the Gulf Coast Visitor Center. This is a unique campground that provides the opportunity to stay on a small island adjacent to the Everglades. Chokoloskee Island Park can accommodate tents and RVs up to 30′ in length, and each site has water, sewer and electric hookups available.

Amenities include a marina store, clubhouse with tv, WiFi, a full kitchen, book exchange, and a beautiful pavilion right on the water.

View the Chokoloskee Island Campground in Google Maps here.

Have a great trip!

That’s it! We hope you’ve found all of the information on camping in Everglades National Park in this post helpful and we know you’ll find the perfect campsite for your upcoming adventure! Be sure to let us know in the comments below if you have any questions or had a great time out camping!

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